Department News

2024.03.01 7th IOC_Thumnail-01 7th IOC World Conference on Prevention of Injury and Illness in Sport SS22 - Technological innovation to protect athlete health through real-time monitoring and decision-making: the case of competition in the heat Tracks Date: FRIDAY , 1 MARCH , 2024 Time: 5:30 PM - 6:30 PM Location: Room Camille Blanc   Details Chair: Dr Chris Esh (Qatar) 17:35 - 17:45 Real-time monitoring of athletes: from the stadium to the desert Chris Esh - Qatar 17:45 - 17:55 The future: technological developments to protect athlete health Yannis Pitsiladis – United Kingdom 17:55 - 18:05 Can we protect 20,000 athletes by monitoring 20 athletes during a mass participation event? Sebastien Racinais – France 18:05 - 18:15 Dealing with extreme heat during major sport events Iphigenia Keramitsoglou – Greece 18:15 - 18:30 Panel Discussion   Speaker Dr Chris Esh Postdoctoral Researcher ASPETAR - Qatar Orthopaedic And Sports Medicine Hospital Introduction – The need for, and practical implementation of, real-time monitoring for competition in the heat   Dr Chris Esh Postdoctoral Researcher ASPETAR - Qatar Orthopaedic And Sports Medicine Hospital Real-time monitoring of athletes: from the stadium to the desert  5:35 PM - 5:45 PM   Professor Yannis Pitsiladis Professor and Head Hong Kong Baptist University The future: technological developments to protect athlete health  5:45 PM - 5:55 PM   PhD Sebastien Racinais Research Engineer CREPS Can we protect 20,000 athletes by monitoring 20 athletes during a mass participation event?  5:55 PM - 6:05 PM   Dr Iphigenia Keramitsoglou Research Director National Observatory of Athens Dealing with extreme heat during major sport events  6:05  PM - 6:15 PM   Click here to learn more about the 7th IOC World Conference 2024.02.26 STC24_Thumnail-01 Barça Innovation Hub - Sports Tomorrow Congress 2024       2023.12.28 20231026_Tadas_Janelle_Thumbnail Fencer’s path to helping athletes heal through Chinese medicine   [DISCOVER HKBU] When she was five, Janelle Leung Ya-lei stumbled across a fencing class at a shopping mall and the chance encounter changed the course of her life. “I saw the fencers suited up in their protective gear, and they looked so cool, so I told my dad I wanted to try it,” she says.   Over time, her passion for fencing grew and when she turned 13, she joined the Fencing Team of Hong Kong, China. The first time she took part in the Asian Junior and Cadet Fencing Championships in 2022, Janelle clinched gold medals in the Junior Category Foil Individual event and Junior Category Foil Team events. Recently, she won a bronze medal in the Women’s Foil Team event at the 2023 Asian Under 23 Fencing Championships.   The enterprising young foil fencer is well on her way to achieve two of her biggest dreams: qualifying for the Olympic Games and becoming a Chinese medicine practitioner who provides healthcare and injury rehabilitation for athletes.   Aspiring to help athletes   For a combat sport which originates in dueling, modern fencing has a relatively low injury rate. Still, fencers may sustain overuse injuries such as strains, sprains, and muscle soreness. To Janelle, injuries can profoundly impact professional athletes.   “For athletes who suffer from injuries, the rehabilitation process may take a long time, which affects their performance and rankings. Therefore, I hope to be able to provide athletes with quality healthcare to help them recover,” she says.   Her interest in sports medicine has turned her attention towards traditional Chinese medicine. She believes traditional Chinese medicine, with its long history and theories of yin and yang and five elements, is effective in preventing chronic illnesses and maintaining health. She is also drawn to Chinese medicine therapies like Tui Na and acupuncture which can aid injured athletes.   With the same assertiveness she applies to fencing, Janelle set her sights on studying Chinese medicine. This year, she was admitted to the Bachelor of Chinese Medicine and Bachelor of Science (Hons) in Biomedical Science programme through HKBU’s Talented Athletes Direct Admission Scheme (TADAS). The University introduced TADAS in response to the Student-Athlete Learning Support and Admission Scheme launched by the University Grants Committee. Besides flexible study arrangements, TADAS also supports outstanding athletes in Hong Kong with personalised mentorship, academic advice, psychological counselling, and career planning.   Dr Hon Sze-sze, Lecturer I of the Department of Sport, Physical Education and Health, coordinates support for elite athletes and says Janelle is driven in her pursuit of academic excellence. “She is resolute in studying Chinese medicine. We are delighted to see students who are determined to take up challenges. The University will support Janelle to help her fulfil her potential in both sports and academic work,” she says.   Janelle Leung Ya-lei was admitted to the Bachelor of Chinese Medicine and Bachelor of Science (Hons) in Biomedical Science programme through HKBU’s Talented Athletes Direct Admission Scheme.   Advancing in sports and studies   As a student athlete, Janelle has to strike a balance between studying and training. Managing a demanding training routine alongside her academic pursuit, Janelle thrives off her busy schedule.   “Balancing my studies and sports development helps me move forward. I use fencing to keep myself from burning out from studying. And when I feel pressure from fencing, I can release it through focusing on my studies,” she says. “I quite enjoy university life.”   She carefully creates a timetable to prioritise different tasks and allocate her time effectively. She also makes use of her time on campus to make new friends and participate in various co-curricular learning opportunities.   Dr Kwan Hiu-yee, Associate Professor of the School of Chinese Medicine, says the School can provide online classes and one-on-one tutorials to accommodate Janelle’s training and competition schedule when necessary. “Janelle has a proactive learning attitude, and she actively asks questions. She also exhibits characteristics of an athlete, such as self-discipline, perseverance, and a strong determination to achieve her goals. These qualities will serve her well in achieving success in both sporting and academic arenas,” says Dr Kwan.   Entering more senior tournaments is Janelle’s short-term goal. Ultimately, she dreams of getting a shot at the Olympic Games and becoming a successful Chinese medicine practitioner who can help athletes in need. “I’m looking forward to performing my best and finding my place in the world,” she says. “Having goals helps me stay motivated.”   Dr Hon Sze-sze (left), Lecturer I of the Department of Sport, Physical Education and Health, coordinates support for elite athletes. Dr Kwan Hiu-yee (right), Associate Professor of the School of Chinese Medicine, says the School can provide online classes and one-on-one tutorials to accommodate Janelle’s training and competition schedule when necessary.   Students who are interested in our TADAS, please refer to Talented Athletes Direct Admission Scheme (TADAS) | Sports | HKBU - The Department of Sport, Physical Education and Health 2023.11.29 231123_UGC_02 Dr. Wendy Huang’s proposal on promoting health & wellness of children recognised by Research Grants Council (RGC) The RGC Award Presentation Ceremony was held on 11 November, and we are proud to announce that Dr HUANG, Wendy Yajun (Associate Professor, SPEH) has been awarded the RGC Research Fellow Scheme (RFS) (2023/24) with the Project "Power the Movement to Get Kids Moving: Development and Evaluation of a Report Card on Active Healthy Lifestyle for the Early Years".         2023.11.08 FungYK_E_final In Memoriam: Mr. Fung Ying Ki